Research

       

Key Research Themes

The four disciplinary-based research groups (AWI, CPO, OPQI) jointly work on three key research themes in imaging physics with a clear societal impact:

  • Life sciences (instrumentation and computational imaging)
  • Healthcare (ultrasonic imaging devices and quantitative biomarker extraction)
  • Industry (electron-based instrumentation, optical techniques, seismic imaging)

Also, each group contributes knowledge to the shared fundamental layer comprising: numerical and analytical image formation modelling, image/data processing, solving inverse problems, and reconstruction.

   

Life Sciences 

 

 

 

 

Elizabeth Carroll

Research Group CPO

Jaap Caro 

Research Group QI

Jacob Hoogenboom

Research Group CPO

Jeroen Kalkman

Research Group QI

Sjoerd Stallinga

Research Group QI

Bernd Rieger

Research Group QI

      

In the Life Sciences Imaging theme, we target cutting edge instrumentation and methods for visualising cells and tissues across a range of length scales. Our emphasis is on nm-scale imaging, where we are leading in multimodal imaging techniques such as integrated correlative light and electron microscopy and in computational microscopy methods. We have developed a unique instrument for simultaneously acquiring high-resolution structural “electron” images and functional fluorescence images with an overlay better than 5 nm for tissue and cell imaging.

In computational microscopy, the experimental design is integrated with image processing for realizing breakthroughs in seeing life at the smallest scales. This includes localisation microscopy with particle averaging and structured illumination microscopy. We are also developing a novel platform for in vivo imaging of zebra fish using optical coherence computerised tomography (OCCT), digital holography and optical tomography.   

     

Healthcare     

Nandini Bhattacharya

Research Group OP

Koen van Dongen

Research Group AWI 

Nico de Jong

Research Group AWI 

Wiro Niessen

Research Group QI  

Martin Verweij

Research Group AWI 

Lucas van Vliet

Research Group QI

Frans Vos  

Research Group QI

    

In the Healthcare Imaging theme, we have two main topics: ultrasound imaging technologies (UST) and quantitative imaging biomarkers. The UST research primarily targets the design and manufacturing of novel ultrasound (matrix) transducers and imaging concepts. Our key expertise is in:

  • Physical modelling of the ultrasound wave propagation in complex tissue
  • Imaging and inversion techniques applied to the recorded wave
  • Prototyping new transducers

Our techniques facilitate reconstruction of detailed, high-resolution images from which useful clinical parameters are extracted (e.g. blood velocities, perfusion, heart muscle stiffness, tumour properties). Our quantitative imaging research is renowned for the development of computational imaging techniques to extract imaging biomarkers for disease management (prediction, diagnosis, staging, prognostics). These techniques are characterised by clever modelling, incorporation of prior knowledge and relying strongly on the physical principles of the image formation. Application areas include:

  • Abdominal CT and MRI (colorectal cancer screening, liver functionality measurement, Crohn’s disease severity determination)
  • Vascular MRI/CT(A) (calcium scoring, stenosis detection and quantification)
  • Diffusion-weighted MRI (ageing studies, stroke rehabilitation)

    

Industry    

Aurèle Adam

Research Group OP

Florian Bociort

Research Group OP

Wim Coene

Research Group OP 

Kees Hagen

Research Group CPO

Pieter Kruit

Research Group CPO

Silvania Pereira

Research Group OP 

Paul Urbach

Research Group OP

Eric Verschuur

Research Group AWI 

   

Apart from inspiration from external developments in science and technology (“science push”), we also find inspiration in high-tech industry (“application pull”). By advancing imaging methods and technologies as used in industry we also create a lasting impact on society. Compared to developments in industry, we work on more fundamental, more general and longer-term innovations. These innovations include new optical sensors and imaging concepts such as super-resolution methods, coherent scatterometry and inverse scattering reconstruction for in-line optical metrology.

Furthermore, we have a worldwide reputation in novel electron- and ion-sources, multi-beam electron imaging, and non-destructive microscopy. Innovations can also be at the level of components with improved or new features (free-form lenses, deformable mirrors, active nano-structures), using new materials (e.g. meta-materials or graded-index materials in optics or semiconductor materials in electron optics) or new production processes such as MEMS. Our contribution to the field is by new theory, computational methods, reconstruction algorithms, physics insights in interaction of radiation with matter or image processing methods. 

   

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